Sourdough Demystified: Sourdough Pizza on the BBQ

To see how I got to this point (preparing the dough) you can start at the beginning.

Otherwise, we’re picking up after bulk fermentation.

Preparing the dough is similar to bread except we don’t need to be as concerned with timing things perfectly (as with bread) and letting the dough “over-proof” a little can actually help us with shaping (the dough is more extensible the longer you let it proof). I’ve left the dough in the fridge for up to a week and it’s still made really tasty pizza. The longer you leave it, the more sour it gets. But you lose some of that fresh, “doughy” flavour, if you’re into that.

I usually make an obnoxious amount of this pizza, equating to 3 extra-large pizzas if you were to order them from an actual pizzeria. Leftovers for DAYS!

One thing I don’t cover as thoroughly as I ought to have in the video is the actual baking portion. If you have a pizza stone, get that thing as hot as you possibly can in your oven. Sourdough responds well to sudden heat transfer, so if you are able to heat up a stone with some decent mass, that heat will quickly transfer into your pizza in the first seconds of baking – giving it a lighter composition as the air bubbles within the dough get a chance to expand.

I bake on oiled parchment paper, and the oil gives the bottom of the pizza a pleasant crispiness which I’ve had difficulty reproducing without a little oil.

I find that my oven struggles to get hot enough to do an adequate job of baking pizza, and I’ve gotten better results on the barbecue with a cast iron plate.

Here’s a video of my current barbecue setup for pizza: